LaFerriere History

LaFerrière Genealogy

Charron dit LaFerrière Genealogy

LaFerriere History

Before 14 AD: The Roman emperor Augustus wanted an East-West road to link Lyons to Saintes, then inhabited by a Celtic tribe called Santons, to disseminate Roman ideas throughout the empire. The wealth accrued through the salt trade was often spent on endowing churches, hostels and abbeys.

419 AD: The Saintonge region was conquered by the Visigoths (West Goths).

987 AD: Hugh Capet, elected king of France in 987, founded the Capetian dynasty. The Capetians initially controlled only the duchy of France (Paris and Orleans), but owing to a shrewd and persistent policy of annexation their jurisdiction extended to other regions. The Truce of Chinon on September 18, 1214 enabled Philip Augustus (1180-1223) to confiscate from the English monarch John Lackland (later, King Henry III of England) the territories of Anjou, Maine, Normandy, Poitou, Saintonge (on the Bay of Biscay), and Touraine.

1096 AD: Saint-Eutrope’s church was consecrated in the town of Saintes, the ancient capital of the Saintonge

March 8, 1625: Pierre Charron (parents unknown) was born in St Eutrope De Saintes, Saintonge, France (now called the Department of Charente Maritime). He was christened in the St Eutrope Church, La Rochelle, Aunis, France. The Department of Charente-Maritime is situated in the southwest region of France. The region was carved out in 1790 from pieces of the ancient provinces of Aunis, Poitou and Saintonge. The region is divided into five arrondissements (or Districts): Jonzac, La Rochelle, Rochefort, Saintes and Saint-Jean-d’Angély. Until 1941, the department was known as Charente-Inférieure.

1626: Gabrielle Beaumont (parents unknown) was born in Saintonge, France.

1640: Anne D’Anneville (daughter of Brice D’Anneville & Marguerite Le Roy) was born in St Eustache, Larochelle, Aunis, France.

1645: Pierre Charron and Gabrielle Beaumont are married in St-Eutrope, Saintes, Saintonge, France. Pierre and Gabrielle are blessed with one child:
Jean Baptiste Charron Dit LaFerrière born February 27, 1646

February 27, 1646: Jean Baptiste Charron Dit LaFerrière was born in St. Eutrope, Saintes Parish, Saintonge, France. He was engage (enlisted) at La Rochelle (A fishing village founded in the 10th Century) on March 15, 1657 at 16 years of age with the Carignan Regiment, LaFouille Company. It is indicated he was from Brouage at that time. Brouage (pictures of Brouage 1 2 3 4)was established in 1555. The harbor of Brouage was the first European place for trading in salt. In the first half of the 17th century, Richelieu transformed it into a Catholic bastion in order to fight against the rival town of La Rochelle. The walls, built between 1630 and 1640, surround the city in a square enclosure of 400 meters on each side. The walls are representative of the art of the fortifications before Vauban.

1656: Anne D’Anneville and Antoine Filion marry in Paris, France. Anne and Antoine are blessed with the following children:

Jean Filion born October 31, 1667

Jean-Baptiste Filion born about 1670

April 27, 1665: Marguerite Le Roy, Gabrielle D’Anneville, Anne D’Anneville, and Husband Antoine Filion embarked from La Rochelle on board the “Cat de Holland”, a trading vessel of 250 barrels. Both Marguerite and Gabrielle are Filles du Roi. They arrived in Québec on June 18, 1665.

June 18, 1665: Jean Baptiste Charron Dit LaFerrière (son of Pierre Charron and Gabrielle Beaumont) arrives in Quebec as a Carignan Regiment Soldier in the LaFouille Company. According to the rolls of the Carignan Regiment, Jean was a Taillandier (an artisan who makes and sells cutting tools like scissors, chisels, shears, etc.). The La Fouille Company came across from France on the ship La Justice that departed La Rochelle on May24, 1665 and arrived on September 12, 1665 accompanying the Saint Sébastien. From these two ships, which sailed together, more than 20 men had died at sea and 130 were too weak to make it ashore by themselves.

1666: The Carignan-Salières Regiment destroys five Mohawk villages, eventually leading to peace between the Iroquois and the French.

1668: The Carignan Regiment is recalled to France. Over 450 members of the Carignan Regiment elected to stay in New France (Quebec) to establish a permanent settlement. Many of the soldiers married a Filles du Roi (King’s Daughter. These were the approximately 770 women who arrived in the colony of New France (Canada) between 1663 and 1673, under the financial sponsorship of King Louis XIV of France. Most were single French women and many were orphans. The King paid for their transportation to Canada and settlement in the colony. Some were given a royal gift of a dowry of 50 livres for their marriage to one of the many unmarried male colonists in Canada. These gifts are reflected in some of the marriage contracts entered into by the Filles du roi at the time of their first marriages. The Filles du Roi were part of King Louis XIV’s program to promote the settlement of his colony in Canada. Some 737 of these women married and the resultant population explosion gave rise to the success of the colony.

1669: ‘Question Extraordinaire’ (torture used to extract testimony) was used in New France at least 30 times against men and women in New France. The Maitre des Hautes Oeuvres or torture master, bound boards to the defendants shins, inserted wedges, and then struck them with a hammer, painfully crushing the bones of the accused.

1669: Gabrielle Beaumont dies in France.

November 16, 1669: Pierre Charron dies in France.

November 16, 1669: Marriage contract filed between Jean Baptiste Charron Dit LaFerrière (son of Pierre Charron and Gabrielle Beaumont) marries Anne D’Anneville. The Notary Public for this contract was Fillion.

November 28, 1669: Jean Baptiste Charron Dit LaFerrière (son of Pierre Charron and Gabrielle Beaumont) marries Anne D’Anneville (widow of Antoine Filion) in Notre Dame, Quebec, Canada. It is assumed Jean continued his trade as a Taillandier. Jean Baptiste and Anne are blessed with the following children:

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Jean Baptiste Charron Dit LaFerrière born February 27, 1686
Louis Charron LaFerrière born January 6, 1671
Angelique Charron LaFerrière born January 7, 1682, died October 26, 1684
Marie-Madeleine Charron LaFerrière born January 11, 1684.
Jacqueline Charron LaFerrière born January 24, 1673
Etienne Charron LaFerrière born January 29, 1678, died December 21, 1694
Marie Anne Charron LaFerrière born October 25, 1674
Claude Charron LaFerrière born December 6, 1676, died February 20, 1677
Genevieve Charron LaFerrière born December 8, 1679

November 14, 1672: Jean Baptiste Charron Dit LaFerrière owes Charles Gautier de la Comporte the sum of 210 pounds (livres)

March 20, 1673: Gilles Rageot, a notary public, lodged a complaint with the Sovereign Council to the effect that the blacksmith shop owned by Jean Baptiste Charron Dit LaFerrière is a fire hazard.

April 13, 1675: The Ursulines (a religious order) sold Jean Baptiste Charron Dit LaFerrière a house with a yard, kitchen, brick oven, and a room without a fireplace on a 37×24′ lot in the Lower Town of Quebec, across from the Magasin de Montreal (Montreal General Store). Jean Baptiste Charron Dit LaFerrière agrees to pay an annual rent of 60 pounds per year, paid in two installments.

The Company of St. Ursula (Ursulines): In the early part of the seventeenth century an appeal was made from Canada for bands of religious women to undertake the arduous task of training the Indian girls to Christian habits of life. It met with an instant and generous response. In 1639 Madame de la Peltrie, a French widow of comfortable means, offered herself and all that she had to found a mission in Canada. In May of that year she sailed from Dieppe accompanied by three Ursulines and three hospital sisters. At Quebec the latter founded a Hôtel-Dieu, the former, the first Ursuline convent on the western continent.

December 18, 1675: Antoine Gentil and Pierre Bulte agreed to supply Jean Baptiste Charron Dit LaFerrière with forty “pipes” of coal, at a price of 3 pounds and 10 Sols per pipe, and agreed to supply him with coal for the year. On the same day, he agreed to provide Antoine Gentil with a “soc” and a “coustre” and all that is necessary to assemble a plow, for 30 pounds, which would be deducted from the amount owing for the coal.

1681: According to the 1681 census he owned a gun.

December 1, 1681: Jean Gauthier Larouche provided Jean Baptiste Charron Dit LaFerrière with a receipt “quittance” for the 200 pounds paid to his daughter Francoise Gauthier as part of a bequest by Francois Jacquet (deceased). The latter was his daughter Jacqueline’s godfather, and had bequeathed his estate to her.

April 29, 1687: Jean Baptiste Charron Dit LaFerrière the house and lot he obtained as a part of the estate against a lot owned by Lucien Bouteville near the Seminary of Quebec. Lucien Bouteville promised to build a house on the lot, and is given 100 pounds.

March 13, 1689: Marie Genevieve DuPil (parents unknown) is born.

October 4, 1691: Jean Baptiste Charron Dit LaFerrière borrowed the sum of 1,140 pounds from Charles Aubert de la Chesnaye for the purpose of repairing his house.

October 14, 1694: Jean Baptiste Charron Dit LaFerrière owed Pierre Rey dit Gaillard for the purchase of on old barque, moored in the “Cul de Sac” harbor.

1697: Jean Baptiste Charron Dit LaFerrière, unable to meet his obligations, vis-à-vis Charles Aubert de la Chesnaye, transferred ownership of his home on Rue Sault-au-Matelot to Charles Aubert de la Chesnaye for the sum of 1,400 pounds from which was deducted the amount owed (1,140 pounds).

August 16, 1698: Jean Baptiste Charron Dit LaFerrière purchased a lot with frontage on “Cul de Sac” harbor for 270 pounds.

1699: Jean Baptiste Charron Dit LaFerrière entered into a partnership with Francois Vildary, another Edge Tool Maker (Taillandier). They agreed to share all costs and revenue.

July 26, 1702: Jean Baptiste Charron Dit LaFerrière dies in the Hôtel-Dieu, Quebec, Canada.

The Hôtel-Dieu: One of the countries most renowned hospital facilities in terms of the quality of health care is also the oldest hospital north of Mexico. So it came about that on August 1, 1639, the three nursing sisters from Dieppe — Mother Superior Marie Guenet de St-Ignace, and Nuns Anne Le Cointre de St-Bernard and Marie Forestier de St-Bonaventure disembarked for Quebec and started work on establishing the first hospital in the Americas north of Mexico. For more than three hundred years, the Order of Augustinian Sisters tirelessly dispensed health care and spiritual guidance to generations of sick people who came to this hospital. The Hôtel-Dieu has been located on its present site since 1644. From the start it had a missionary purpose and dispensed spiritual as well as bodily care to the sick. In those days its patients were accommodated in two wards holding about forty beds each. In spite of a difficult environment and very modest resources, the Hôtel-Dieu was far from being an antechamber of death: nine out of ten patients emerged cured or at least in remission.

January 20, 1710: Jean Baptiste Charron Dit LaFerriere (son of Jean Baptiste Charron Dit LaFerrière and Anne D’Anneville) marries Marie Genevieve DuPil in St Augustin, Portneuf, Quebec, Canada. According to census information, Jean worked as a Blacksmith and Taillandier. Jean and Marie are blessed with the following children:

Jean-Baptiste Charron LaFerrière born April 23, 1719
Marie-Louise Charron LaFerrière born October 4, 1716
Marie-Marguerite Charron LaFerrière born February 20, 1730
Female Charron LaFerrière born March 2, 1724 and died March 2, 1724
Marie-Cecile Charron LaFerrière born November 3, 1721
Marie-Thecle Charron LaFerrière born November 3, 1725
Marie-Genevieve Charron LaFerrière born November 8, 1710
Marie-Madeleine Charron LaFerriere born November 8, 1714
Marie-Angelique Charron LaFerrière born December 11, 1712

June 28, 1711: Anne D’Anneville dies in the Hôtel-Dieu, Quebec, Canada. She was buried in Montreal, Canada.

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1720: Marie Josèphe Samson is born in Lauzon, Quebec, Canada.

November 14, 1739: Jean Baptiste Charron Dit LaFerrière (son of Jean Baptiste Charron Dit LaFerrière and Marie Gebevieve DuPil) marries Marie Josèphe Samson in Lauzon, Quebec, Canada. Jean and Marie are blessed with the following children:

Jean Charron Dit LaFerrière born about 1745
Joseph-Jean Charron LaFerrière born January 6, 1742
Ignace Charron LaFerrière born September 3, 1744, died March 10, 1746
Marie-Josèphe Charron LaFerrière born January 24, 1747
Pierre-Marie Charron LaFerrière born March 24, 1749
Marie-Suzanne Charron LaFerrière born August 23, 1751
Joseph Charron LaFerrière born January 6, 1754, died November 28, 1755
Male Charron LaFerrière born April 5, 1756 and died April 5, 1756
Marie-Élisabeth Charron LaFerrière born April 17, 1757, died June 10, 1757
Marguerite Charron LaFerrière born January 21, 1761

1746: Marie-Madeleine Clément Dit LaBonte (daughter of Andre Clement Dit LaBonte & Marie-Françoise Dubeau) is born in Canada.

September 13, 1752: Marie Genevieve DuPil (LaFerrière) dies and is buried in La Durantaye, Quebec, Canada.

May 23, 1757: Jean Baptiste Charron Dit LaFerrière (son of Jean Baptiste Charron Dit LaFerrière and Anne D’Anneville) dies and is buried in La Durantaye, Quebec, Canada.

February 4, 1765: Jean Charron Dit LaFerrière (son of Jean Baptiste Charron Dit LaFerrière and Marie Josèphe Samson) marries Marie-Madeleine Clément Dit LaBonte in St Michel, Bellechasse, Quebec, Canada. Jean and Marie are blessed with the following child:

Joseph LaFerrière born about 1779

April 30, 1765: Marie Josèphe Samson (LaFerrière) dies and is buried in La Durantaye, Quebec, Canada.

February 12, 1785: Marie-Margurite Marcoux (daughter of Antoine-Marie Marcoux & Marie Gagnon) is born in St Marie, Beauce, Quebec, Canada.

February 15, 1803: Joseph LaFerrière (son of Jean Charron Dit LaFerrière & Marie-Madeleine Clément Dit LaBonte) marries Marie-Margurite Marcoux in St Marie, Beauce, Quebec, Canada. Joseph and Marie are blessed with the following children:

Louis LaFerrière born about March 17, 1821
Jean Michel Charron LaFerrière born July 20, 1805

April 7, 1822: Catherine Patry (daughter of Francois Patry born about 1798 in St Gervais, Bellechasse, Quebec and Marie Margurite Aube born August 05, 1797 in St Gervais, Bellechasse, Quebec) in St Gervais, Bellechasse, Quebec, Canada.

July 25, 1843: Louis LaFerrière (son of Joseph LaFerrière and Marie-Margurite Marcoux) marries Catherine Patry in St Gervais, Bellechasse, Quebec, Canada. While living in Canada, Louis is a farmer. Louis and Catherine are blessed with the following children:

Joseph LaFerrière born about 1861
George LaFerrière born about 1864
Antonia LaFerrière born about May 1865
Emma LaFerrière born about 1866
Euphremie LaFerrière born about 1856
Pierre LaFerrière born about 1862
Katherine LaFerrière born about 1858
Cyrille LaFerrière born about 1843
Philomene LaFerrière
Matilda LaFerrière born about 1854
Rose LaFerrière
Marie Philomene LaFerrière born July 23, 1844

February 1871: Eulalie LePage (daughter of Dennis LePage and Emelie Saint Laurent) is born. Probably in Fall River, Massachusetts.

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June 2, 1880; United States Census: Tiverton, Rhode Island Census records for June 2, 1880 places Louis and his family at 15 Shove Mills Block in Tiverton, Rhode Island. Shove Mills Block was a series of houses owned by the Shove Mills. At the time of the census over 275 people were renting in the Shove Mill housing complex and almost all the tenants were French Canadian. Shove Mill housing was newly built, and contrary to the horrible conditions of other mill housing in the city it was very attractive. The Shove Mill Houses were built on very high ground just over the Massachusetts state line in Rhode Island. The mill owners stated purpose for this was to save money on taxes since Rhode Island taxes were much lower than Fall River, Massachusetts taxes at the time. Mill operatives would offer a different point of view for this geographic strategy. Operatives stated that the housing was built just over the line in Rhode Island in order for the mill owners to skirt Massachusetts law, which limited work hours and prohibited the use of young children in the mills. Rhode Island law allowed 12-hour workdays and permitted the use of child labor. The housing at Shove Mills did not have the sewage problems that plagued many other mill housing developments. Water was obtained from wells and hydrants in the yards.

Statistics of Labor for Fall River, Massachusetts during this time period show what the cost of living was for a French Canadian family working in the mills. Note the following example:

Laborer in the Mill
Father $402.00 per year
Son (Age 15) $188.00 per year

Condition – family numbers 6, with parents and four children from three to fifteen years of age; two go to school. Have a tenement of 4 rooms with good surroundings. The house is poorly furnished. Family dresses moderately well.

Lifestyle & Annual Costs of Living

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Breakfast would consist of bread, butter, molasses, and coffee.
Dinner would consist of meat, potatoes, sometimes vegetables, and bread.
Supper would consist of bread, butter, and tea.

Annual Costs:

Rent $80
Fish $9
Dry Goods $12
Fuel $43
Milk $18
Groceries $312
Sundries $27
Shoes $17
Meat $37
Clothing $33
Total $588

You can see that the average family had very little left over after working 70 hours per week. The advantage that Louis LaFerrière and his family had over many other families was in their numbers. They were young adults who were able to work. If the younger children earned $188 each and the older children earned an average of $300 per year, the family would have had a yearly income of about $2000. Their yearly living expenses would extrapolate out to about $1350. This would leave the family with a cushion and the ability to eventually move out of the mill housing and find other more inhabitable living quarters in a relatively short period of time.

Mill work was however quite brutal. The day usually started early and ended at 5pm – 6pm. The mills were hot, stuffy, choked with cotton lint, and just down right dangerous to work in. A lot of injuries occurred while working the spinning machines and many operatives succumbed to lung borne disease later in life undoubtedly due to the cotton fibers inhaled over many years of work. Operatives usually worked more than one machine at a time with children use as setup personnel and runners. Workers would make their lunch the night before because there was little time in the morning to get ready for work. The workers carried their lunch to the mill in a metal can and ate it there. Supper was usually served at 7pm and workers were in bed by 8pm. Mill operatives also worked on Saturdays, which meant that the only day off was Sunday. Sunday was spent attending mass and seeing to the chores that could not be attended to during the week. In essence, an operative spent very little time at home except to sleep. It should also be noted that French Canadians were at the bottom of the pay scale for wage earnings. German and Irish workers received higher wages than most other nationalities working as mill operatives.

The Shove Mills where Louis and his family worked actually consisted of three mills (one on Laurel Lake and one in Globe Village, Fall River, MA. The other was over the line in Tiverton, R. I.), which were started in 1872 and closed in 1932. The Shove Mills operated 77,728 spindles.

1813 – 1916 Fall River, Massachusetts: With the Whaling Industry on the decline the first textile mill was built in Fall River, Massachusetts in 1813. By 1913, Fall River had over 100 mills making Fall River the largest producer of of cotton in the 1890’s.

1880 – 1910: The Canadian Migration to the United States. During the second half of the 19th century, the eastern U.S. witnessed phenomenal growth in its textile industry, beginning in the northern states and expanding into the South. Faced with a shortage of workers following the Civil War, mill owners looked abroad to supplement their workforce. Immigrants flooded in from Canada and Europe, some coming alone and others bringing entire families to work in the mills. By the end of the century, foreign workers outnumbered native workers in all New England states. The majority of textile workers were French Canadian, with children comprising a large percentage. For example, among male and female employees under the age of sixteen, the percentage of Franco-Americans in Maine and Rhode Island was greater than the percentage of Franco-Americans overall.

1880: Louis LaFerrière (son of Joseph LaFerrière and Marie-Margurite Marcoux) migrates to Tiverton, Rhode Island. The Fall River, Massachusetts census of June 2, 1880 places Louis and his family at 15 Shove Mills Block in Tiverton, Rhode Island. Most of the family worked in the cotton mills for many years. Louis and his family lived at the following locations:

Residences: (Based on census and city directories)
1880 – 1883: 15 Shove Mills Block, Tiverton, Rhode Island
1884 – 1886: 28 King Philip St., Fall River, Massachusetts
1887 – 1888: 6 East Hall St., Fall River, Massachusetts
1889 – 1895: 6 Wesley St., Fall River, Massachusetts
1896 – 1900: 16 Scott St., Fall River, Massachusetts
1901 – 1902: 12 Scott St. Fall River, Massachusetts
1903 – 1904: 16 Scott St. Fall River, Massachusetts

1900 Census: The 1900 United States Census lists the following for Louis and Catherine LaFerrière:

Louis LaFerrière
Place of Birth: Canada
Date of Birth: March 1820
Years Married: 60
Age: 80
Number of Years in US: 20
Year of Immigration to US: 1880
Can you read: No
Occupation: Landlord
Can you speak English: No
Can you write: No
Months not employed: 12
Do you own your own home: Yes
Address: 16 Scott St., Fall River, Massachusetts

Name: Catherine LaFerrière
Place of Birth: Canada
Date of Birth: April 1823
Years Married: 60
Age: 77
Number of Years in US: 20
Year of Immigration to US: 1880
How many children: 13
How many living: 7
Can you read: No
Occupation: Landlord
Can you speak English: No
Can you write: No
Months not employed: 12
Do you own your own home: Yes
Address: 16 Scott St., Fall River, Massachusetts

August 03, 1894: Joseph LaFerrière (son of Louis LaFerrière and Catherine Patry) marries Eulalie LePage in Fall River, Massachusetts. Father Raymond Colin (Catholic Priest) conducted the ceremony. Joseph and Eulalie are blessed with the following children:

Joseph Alexandre LaFerrière born May 5, 1898
Anatole LaFerrière
Alfred LaFerrière
Antoinette LaFerrière
Emilie LaFerrière
Eva LaFerrière

From approximately 1898 to 1903, they lived at 42 Price Place, Fall River, Massachusetts. Both Joseph and Catherine worked as laborers in the textile mills in Fall River, Massachusetts.

Joseph LaFerrière fell from the roof of St Mary’s Church in Fall River, Massachusetts. He was crippled in the fall and died later (date unknown) as a result of his injuries.

May 06, 1898: Joseph Alexandre LaFerrière (son of Joseph LaFerrière and Eulalie LePage) is baptized in St. Anne’s Church, Fall River, Massachusetts.

1903: Joseph LaFerriere (son of Joseph LaFerrière and Eulalie LePage) and his wife Catherine moved the family to Remouski, Canada and then to Coaticook, Canada. This is probably due to the decline in work available in the mills. All information indicates they lived and worked on farms in the Coaticook area.

July 17, 1904: Louis LaFerrière (son of Joseph LaFerrière and Marie-Margurite Marcoux) dies in Fall River, Massachusetts of old age. He is buried at St Mary’s Cemetery, southern end near the Tiverton, RI line, Fall River, Massachusetts.

March 28, 1906: Rose Marie Cameron (daughter of Joseph Cameron and Marie Gagnon) is born in Winslow, Quebec, Canada.

1907: Efstratos Ariges enters the United States from Greece on the SS Polonia through New York City

May 07, 1908: Joseph Alexandre LaFerrière (son of Joseph LaFerrière and Eulalie LePage) is baptized for a second time in La Patrie (The Fatherland), Quebec, Canada.

February 8, 1911: Catherine Patry dies in Fall River, Massachusetts of General Asthenia and is buried at St Mary’s Cemetery, Fall River, Massachusetts.

September 4, 1924: Joseph Alexandre LaFerrière (son of Joseph LaFerrière and Eulalie LePage) marries Rose Marie Cameron in Saint Marc Church, Coaticook, Quebec, Canada. Joseph and Rose are blessed with the following children:

Joseph Armand Renald LaFerrière born April 13, 1932
Jean LaFerrière
Germain LaFerrière
Lucien LaFerrière
Raymond LaFerrière
Andre LaFerrière born April 8, 1943
Theresa LaFerrière born January 30, 19??
Rita LaFerrière
Marthe LaFerrière born July 14, 1945
Denise LaFerrière born October 26, 1948

1935: Joseph Alexandre LaFerrière (son of Joseph LaFerrière and Eulalie LePage) moves his family from Coaticook, Quebec, Canada to Manchester, New Hampshire. It is there that he works at the Habitant Soup Plant.

April 22, 1935: Mary Alice Aregis (daughter of Estratus Aregis and Alice Laura Batchelder) is born in New Hampshire.

May 29, 1940: Joseph Armand Renald LaFerrière (son of Joseph Alexandre LaFerrière and Rose Marie Cameron) is baptized in St Jean l’Evangiliste, Coaticook, Quebec, Canada. His godparents are Anatole LaFerrière and Eglantine Dube.

6 December 1950 until 5 December 1953: Joseph Armand Renald LaFerrière enlists in the United States Army and serves with the 82nd Airborne Division, Combat Engineers.

February 27, 1951: Eulalie LePage (daughter of Dennis LePage and Emelie Saint Laurent) dies in Coaticook-Nord, Quebec, Canada.

August 15, 1953: Joseph Armand Renald LaFerrière (son of Joseph Alexandre LaFerrière and Rose Marie Cameron) marries Mary Alice Aregis at Ft Campbell, Kentucky; Joseph and Mary are blessed with the following children:

Joseph A. R. LaFerrière, Jr.
Frank Joseph LaFerrière
Paul Joseph LaFerrière
Donna Ann LaFerrière
Richard Alexander LaFerrière

Joseph and his family lived at the following locations:

1959 – 1972: 760 Central Avenue, Dover, New Hampshire
1972 – 1999: 16 French Cross Road, Madbury, New Hampshire

10 January 1955 until 5 January 1966: Joseph Armand Renald LaFerrière serves with the United States Air Force. He worked as a munitions loader with the 509th Bomb Wing at Pease AFB, New Hampshire.

June 1965: Joseph Armand Renald LaFerrière opens LaFerrière’s Cabinet Shop in Dover, New Hampshire. He custom designed many kitchens for residents of the seacoast area.

June 1975: Joseph Armand Renald LaFerrière moves LaFerrière’s Cabinet Shop to his farm in Madbury, New Hampshire.

April 5, 1977: Joseph Armand Renald LaFerrière (son of Joseph Alexandre LaFerrière and Rose Marie Cameron) marries Dina Trejo in San Pedro Sula, Honduras. Joseph and Dina are bless with the following children:

Donaldo Helmuth Trejo LaFerrière
Marcos Alexander LaFerrière

March 1, 1988: Rose Marie Cameron/LaFerrière (daughter of Joseph Cameron and Marie Gagnon) dies in Manchester, New Hampshire. She is buried at St. Charles Cemetery, Dover, New Hampshire.

October 7, 1992: Joseph Alexandre LaFerrière (son of Joseph LaFerrière and Eulalie LePage) dies at the Rochester, New Hampshire nursing home. He is buried next to his wife (Rose Marie Cameron/LaFerrière) at St. Charles Cemetery, Dover, New Hampshire.

July 11, 1999: Joseph Armand Renald LaFerrière (son of Joseph Alexandre LaFerrière and Rose Marie Cameron) dies in Madbury, New Hampshire. He is buried next to his parents at St Charles Cemetery, Dover, New Hampshire.

August 21, 2002: Mary Alice Aregis (daughter of Estratus Aregis and Alice Laura Batchelder) dies in Grass Valley, California.

The story is far from over.

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